Does it smell as sweet to you?

Thanks to a stuffy nose, I’m not smelling much of anything right now (and based on the sneezes I hear on the subway, I’m not the only one). But when I’m not congested, the odors I like and don’t like are somewhat off-kilter: Gas stations smell really good to me, while lilies smell like death.

An article from Scientific American explains a possible reason for my skewed aroma preferences: The many genetic combinations that code our olfactory receptors differ markedly from one person to the next. One person may not even be able to detect a scent, while another may find it particularly intense.

Experience may play a large role, as well. In 2009, Andreas Keller, one of the scientists quoted in the article, reported on research into the variability of odor memories for Current Biology. Scientists from the Weizmann Institute of Science determined that the hippocampus, a memory center of the brain, likely plays a role in the formation of strong associations between scent and memory. Early associations—even those formed in utero and while breastfeeding—will persist, while later ones will not be as strong. This may be one reason for strongly held cultural scent and food preferences

Dr. Keller is one of several researchers now studying the inability of people with schizophrenia to identify some common scents; this dysfunction is likely due to the brain regions impacted by the disorder, which are also connected to the ability to process smells. Like those with schizophrenia, people with bipolar disorder also appear to have difficulty identifying odors, rating scents as being more pleasant that people without the disorder.

Want to know more about how well people smell? My colleague, Ann Whitman, wrote about the topic for this blog last year. You can also check out a 2001 Cerebrum story on olfaction, which explains why some people like the smell of skunks.

–Johanna Goldberg

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One Response to Does it smell as sweet to you?

  1. Isaac Sashitzky says:

    This is so very interesting – our other senses – seeing, hearing, etc. also have differences in what people finds pleasant or unpleasant. “That is music to my ears” – can be noise to someone else; or “Beauty is in the eyes of the beholder” – what one finds beautiful can be ‘ugly’ to someone else. I wonder as far as any of the senses, if there are things people universally agree on (without exception) that it is pleasant to see, hear, or smell.

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