Dana Launches Expert Videos for the Public

The Dana Foundation is happy to announce a new resource available on its YouTube channel–a compilation of brain science videos featuring Dana Alliance for Brain Initiatives (DABI) neuroscientists on their fields of expertise.

DABI members are prominent neuroscientists from around the world, who have pledged their commitment to advancing public awareness and education about the progress and promise of brain research. With over 350 Alliance members, it can be hard to keep track of the latest in their areas of research. This collection of videos will make the information more accessible to the public.

In this series, there are 87 playlists dedicated to a diverse range of topics in neuroscience (i.e. dementia, stress, neural plasticity, etc.), and each is populated with videos featuring DABI members. The videos are dated from 2010 to the present day, and new content will be posted as it becomes available.

In addition to being a comprehensive resource for brain science information, this series serves as a celebration of the work done by neuroscientists around the world.

SfN Brain Awareness Video Contest Winners

The Society for Neuroscience has announced the winners of the 2015 Brain Awareness video contest. Anyone can enter and work with a member of the Society for Neuroscience in their area to produce an educational video about the brain.

The first place winner, Matthew Sugrim’s, video discusses our perception of color and poses the question: “Do We See The Same Red?” The video is a stunningly simple and colorful animation of the neurochemical process of sight, specifically how the brain turns photons into color. He insists that “it is complicated, but it’s not magic. Variations in the composition of cones in our eyes and the exact wiring of our brains may cause very slight variations in color perception.” Regardless, red really is the same red to everyone. Interestingly, many people have learned from the recent viral phenomenon of The Dress that lighting and color context can create much more variance in how people perceive color.

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New Podcast: Dementia Decoded


Starting last week (April 23), the New York Academy of Sciences began airing weekly episodes of the new podcast series, Dementia Decoded. Sponsored by the Dana Foundation, the five-part program aims to educate the public on topics such as the history of Alzheimer’s disease, prevention, risk reduction, diagnosis, and care. The episodes also feature different specialists in the field, including our very own Dana Alliance members: Richard Mayeux, M.D., Reisa Sperling, M.D., and Rudolph Tanzi, Ph.D. (Tanzi was just acknowledged by TIME Magazine as one of the world’s top influential figures of the year for his work on finding a cure for Alzheimer’s.)

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“TIME 100” Recognizes Rudy Tanzi, Ph.D.

Last week, Time Magazine published its annual list of the world’s most influential pioneers. We are pleased to announce that Dana Alliance member, Rudolph Tanzi, Ph.D., has been deemed a “TIME 100” honoree for his leading research on finding a cure for Alzheimer’s disease.

Tanzi currently serves as Chair of the Cure Alzheimer’s Fund Research Consortium, Professor of Neurology at Harvard University, and director of the Genetics and Aging Research Unit at Massachusetts General Hospital, as well as head of the Alzheimer’s Genome Project.

From left, Rudy Tanzi, with Joe Perry of Aerosmith and Francis Collins of the National Institutes of Health, in a photo from the Rockstars of Science series that first ran in GQ magazine in 2009.(Geoffrey Beene Gives Back/GQ)

From left, Rudy Tanzi, with Joe Perry of Aerosmith and Francis Collins of the National Institutes of Health, in a photo from the Rockstars of Science series that first ran in GQ magazine in 2009.(Geoffrey Beene Gives Back/GQ)

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Brain Quiz Show Tonight

A signature event of Brain Awareness Week is the Brain Bee, which tests high school students’ knowledge of neuroscience in a live Q&A competition.  Students compete in local competitions, which lead to a national competition in Maryland in March, and then on to the International contest, which this year is taking place in Cairns, Australia in August.

Thanks to our friends at Brainfacts.org, I’ve recently learned of another neuroscience quiz show, this time in the undergraduate arena. The Center for Biomedical Neuroscience (CBN) Brain Bowl “includes three rounds of short answer questions that get more difficult with each round. The final round is a complex ‘challenge’ question, where teams can wager points they have accumulated in the previous rounds.” This year’s competing universities are Trinity University, University of Texas at Dallas, and University of Texas at Arlington.

If you’re curious to see what it’s all about, check out the livestream tonight at 7 p.m. CST (8 p.m. EST). You can also read more about the competition on the UT Health Science Center website.

-Ann L. Whitman


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