From the Archives: Striking Back at Stroke

StrikingBackStroke_featWhen she was 43, journalist and former nurse Cleo Hutton had a severe stroke. Suddenly unable to speak, understand, or even walk, Hutton struggled first to survive and then to regain her physical skills and her independence. Her book Striking Back at Stroke: A Doctor-Patient Journal combines entries from her personal journal with medical and scientific commentary by Louis R. Caplan, an expert in US stroke medicine and a member of the Dana Alliance for Brain Initiatives. Dana Press published the book in 2003 (11 years after her stroke), and we ran an excerpt of it in our Cerebrum journal, “The War of Rehabilitation.” Here’s a bit from Hutton’s journal:

Continue reading

MS: What We Know and What We Need to Learn

Multiple sclerosis is a neurological disease that can affect a person’s mobility and basic body functions. While we have learned more about this disease and treatments, there is much more to know, according to David Hafler, M.D., and Benjamin A. Lerner, a medical student and research fellow at Yale School of Medicine, authors of the latest Report on Progress.

Continue reading

Dana News E-Blast: May

Below is last week’s Dana news email blast. You can sign up to receive this (and other Dana email alerts and/or print publications) by going here.

The Power of Tau


by Kenneth S. Kosik, MD

Tau protein helps nerve cells in the brain maintain their function and structure. When tau turns toxic, replicates, and spreads, neurons misfire and die. If neuroscientists can pinpoint the reasons for toxicity, identify possible modified tau states, and find a way to block tau’s movement from cell to cell, then progress can be made in fighting any number of neurological disorders. From Cerebrum, our online magazine of ideas. Continue reading

Report on Progress: Disorders of Consciousness

The first Report on Progress this year comes from Thomas I. Cochrane, M.D., MBA Neurology, Brigham & Women’s Hospital, and Michael A. Williams, M.D., FAAN, The Sandra and Malcolm Berman Brain and Spine Institute LifeBridge Health. The doctors take the readers through two possible stages of consciousness after injury, using a case study approach.

“Approximately five minutes after a terrible car accident that ejected Matt Trenton from his car, first responders found him face down and not breathing. They placed an endotracheal (breathing) tube in his trachea (windpipe) and transported him to the hospital, where he was admitted to the ICU. He received treatments, such as medications to elevate blood pressure, ventilator support of breathing, and IV fluids for hydration, all of which are necessary to support the brain and the body so that the brain can recover from injury.

Continue reading


Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 147 other followers

%d bloggers like this: