Public Event: The Anxious Brain

anxious brain AAAS.jpg

Phobias are the most common mental disorders in the United States, affecting about 10% of all adults, and many of them can be highly debilitating. They are a type of anxiety disorder, defined by a persistent fear of an object or situation, leaving some people unable to function in ordinary life. You have likely heard of acrophobia (fear of heights), arachnophobia (fear of spiders), and claustrophobia (fear of confined spaces). But have you heard of ephebiphobia (fear of teenagers), mageirocophobia (fear of cooking), or phobophobia (a fear of phobias)? The list goes on. Why do people develop phobias? Are some more susceptible than others? What mechanisms in the brain are in play when phobias strike and what does research reveal about effective treatments? Join us for this event and learn more about why phobias arise, the damage they can do, and how best to treat them, unless, of course, you are afflicted by sophophobia.

When:
October 18, 2016
5:30 pm – 8:00 pm EST

Where:
AAAS Headquarters
1200 New York Avenue NW
Washington, DC, 20005

Speakers:
Joseph E. Ledoux, Ph.D.
Henry and Lucy Moses Professor of Science, New York University

Daniel S. Pine, M.D.
Chief, Section on Development and Affective Neuroscience, National Institute of Mental Health, NIH

Register by: October 17, 2016 11:59 pm EST

Hosted by AAAS and the Dana Foundation

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