Successful Aging & Your Brain at Marlene Meyerson JCC Manhattan

After an inaugural, successful, and sold-out program last September, Marlene Meyerson JCC Manhattan partnered with the Dana Foundation once again to present Successful Aging & Your Brain (SA&YB) Tuesday evening—this time in celebration of Brain Awareness Week!

Speaker Matthew Fink, M.D., Neurologist-in-Chief at New York-Presbysterian and chairman, neurology at Weill Cornell Medicine, has participated as a panelist for SA&YB programs multiple times and has also frequently spoken at Marlene Meyerson JCC Manhattan. He discussed brain function, changes in the brain as we age, memory, brain diseases and disorders, and maximizing brain function and health.

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2018 Brain Day at NYU

nyubrainday1

Photo: Heather McKellar

New York University’s Brain Day at NYU Langone Health took place on Tuesday, March 13th, as part of BraiNY and the Dana Foundation’s long-standing collaboration to celebrate Brain Awareness Week! The event included a Brain Fair in the Farkas breezeway, where booths provided information on the brain, displayed models of brains to examine, and, of course, presented some real brains to hold, too. For those looking for a challenge, there was “Brain Jeopardy” for visitors to test their knowledge of the brain. This year, there was even a 3-D printer creating model of brain cells, including a Purkinje cell, a type of neuron found in the cerebral cortex that releases a neurotransmitter called GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid)! Dana publications and materials were handed out to attendees, which included many high school students.

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Two Successful Aging & Your Brain Programs in NYC

MemoryAre you interested in learning about the brain and living a brain-healthy lifestyle as you age? Do you live in New York City? Then look no further, there are two free Successful Aging & Your Brain programs on Tuesday, March 13th!

Both programs begin with discussions on memory, normal age-related changes in the brain, brain diseases and disorders, and tips for keeping the brain healthy as we age, followed by an audience Q&A session.

NYU Langone Health

The first program is from 2 to 4 pm at NYU Langone Health’s Alumni Hall B at 550 First Avenue at 32nd Street. A panel will feature three experts from NYU Langone’s Center for Cognitive Neurology: Andreia Godinho De Andrade, Sonja Blum, and Elkhonon Goldberg. Jyoti Patel, research assistant professor in the department of neurosurgery at NYU Langone, will moderate the panel.

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New Year’s Resolution: Successful Aging & Your Brain

The beginning of a new year usually starts with resolutions–to eat healthier, to exercise more, or to improve quality of life in some way. Keeping your brain healthy, understanding how the brain works, and learning how to maximize brain function should be added to that list! Good mental health or “cognitive fitness” are as important to a good overall quality of life as physical health– in fact, the two are related!

You can get started on your brain-y new year’s resolution by reading our Successful Aging & Your Brain booklet, which explains how people of all ages can improve their brain fitness (pages 18 to 32) while also focusing on how the brain (specifically memory) works and what types of brain diseases and disorders can affect adults later in life. The ways to keep your brain healthy can be broken down into four steps–or factors–of successful aging that have been scientifically proven to make a difference.

Our short Successful Aging & Your Brain video outlines the four factors that contribute to a brain-healthy lifestyle.

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Neuroscience and Society: The Meditating Brain

Many people who meditate, practice yoga, or pray report a sense of calm and well-being that extends beyond the time spent in each practice. Using modern neuroscience techniques, researchers have sought to quantify effects of these practices. What do we know so far?

“You can think of meditation as a form of attention training,” said Sara Lazar of Harvard during a panel at the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) last week. The practice involves sustained attention, awareness of your thoughts and sensations, and holding in mind the intention to stay focused. Showing mainly results from studies investigating mindfulness meditation, she described changes in brain structure seen in new meditators after just eight weeks, including increased volume of gray matter and the left hippocampus, and decrease in size of the amygdala.

Social Media - Lazar

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