Parkinson’s Disease on the Mind

People often associate tremor with Parkinson’s disease (PD), a progressive neurodegenerative disorder originally named “shaking palsy,” but did you know that one-quarter to one-third of patients don’t exhibit this symptom? At Wednesday night’s event for Brain Awareness Week, “On the Mind: Parkinson’s, Movement, and Dance,” we heard from top NYU doctors about symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment, but also from a PD patient on his experience with disease and how dance helped him come to terms with his diagnosis.

There are four cardinal clinical features of PD: rest tremor, slowness, stiffness in muscles, and balance problems, said Andrew Feigin, M.D., director of the Fresco Institute at NYU Langone Health. Not everyone gets all four, he said, but people with Parkinsonism have two or more, and are often diagnosed with PD. Because it is a progressive disease, these symptoms can lead to other troubles, including quiet or slurred speech, difficulty swallowing, and shuffling gait, as well as non-motor features such as depression, impulse control, and sleep disturbances.

Actor Michael J. Fox and the late boxer Muhammad Ali, both diagnosed with PD, dramatically increased public awareness of the disease in the past few decades, but it was first discovered in the early 1800s by James Parkinson. Around 1 million people in the U.S. and 6 million people worldwide have PD.

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The Ethics of Artificial Intelligence and Data Science

It may be more than coincidence that the NYU Center for Data Science (CDS) chose to hold its Fifth Anniversary Celebration during Brain Awareness Week. The event, held in a well-appointed room at Vanderbilt Hall in New York City, opened with speeches by New York University’s new Vice Provost of Research Staci Grossman Bloom and new CDS Director Julia Kempe that focused on the importance of data science as a vital multi-disciplinary field and the enormous growth of the center in just five years.

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From left: Julia Kempe, Arthur Spirling, Yann LeCun, Daniel Sodickson, Julia Stoyanovich, and Brenden Lake. Photo courtesy of NYU CDS

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Brain Fairs for Brain Awareness Week

Brain Fairs for Brain Awareness Week

Prior to Brain Awareness Week, we encouraged you to watch our video on how to organize a successful brain fair, and now that Brain Awareness Week is here, we encourage you to see one in action! Across the globe, brain fairs—stations with activities and information about the brain set up at hospitals, universities, community centers, and more—are a popular activity for organizers and attendees alike. They’re a great way to share a range of brain science topics, while also drawing attention to the work or focus of the organizer.

In New York City this week, we have our pick of brain fairs to attend—so we’ve chosen to attend several of them! We offer some highlights in photos from the NYC brain fair scene.

BioBase Harlem at Columbia’s Zuckerman Institute: Continue reading

The Fast and the Curious: Science on Wheels

Brain Awareness Week just rolled into town—no, really. The BioBus, a New York City science lab on wheels, helped kick off this year’s Brain Awareness Week with a day of brainy crafts, mind-benders, and maximum magnification courtesy of the lab’s research-grade microscopes.

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Science enthusiasts get “hands-on” with human and sheep brains (center and bottom-right, respectively) in Manhattan’s historic Harlem, N.Y. March 9, 2019.

Brain Awareness Week is all about outreach, and the BioBus–with its solar-panels, lab equipment, and Ph.D. cadre of scientists–is well equipped on its mission of bringing science exploration and the thrill of discovery to historically underrepresented communities. The organization lists its goal as helping “minority, female, and low-income K-12 and college students in New York City discover, explore, and pursue science.” It should come as no surprise then, that the science and activities on-board are tailored to jump-start the spark of curiosity nascent in tomorrow’s scientists. Continue reading

Happy Brain Awareness Week!

logo_2019datesIt’s officially Brain Awareness Week starting today until Sunday, March 17, and people all over the world will be participating in activities about the brain! Every year, Brain Awareness Week partners organize events to educate people about the organ responsible for all that we are and all that we do.

Events are taking place in schools, concert halls, public plazas, cafes, museums, even on boats. If you are unable to make an in-person event, there are plenty of others in the virtual realm, including radio shows, television shows, and webinars. To find events in your area, visit the Brain Awareness Week Calendar of Events and search for your country and city (and state, if you are in the U.S.).

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Participants celebrate Brain Awareness Week 2018 at an event organized by Gaston College in Dallas, Texas.

Currently, there are over 680 events on the calendar, and even more will be added throughout the week. Some events listed will take place later in the month as well. If you are based in the New York City area, check out the braiNY calendar, organized by the Greater NYC Chapter of the Society for Neuroscience. Continue reading

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