Sound Health: Music and the Mind

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Kennedy Center for the Arts have teamed up to explore the connections among music, the brain, and human wellness. The idea for the “Sound Health” partnership came up in conversations between NIH director Francis Collins and renowned soprano and Kennedy Center artistic advisor Renée Fleming. In March NIH hosted a science workshop, where researchers shared what they know about sound and sense with Fleming and other musicians, scientists, and music therapists. This past weekend, they moved to the Kennedy Center for a shared performance with the National Symphony Orchestra and a day of talk and music-making for the general public.

Bone flute from Geissenklösterle, a cave in Germany. Photo by José-Manuel Benito Álvarez

“Music is a critical part in understanding how the brain works,” Collins said on Friday. It’s likely that early people made music before developing formal language–we’ve found  flutes that are more than 35,000 years old. “It’s critical to understanding” how the oldest circuits in our brains work, and it can add “new and stronger scientific basis” to the range of techniques that music therapists use to help people recover from stroke, trauma, chronic pain, and other maladies.

All the Saturday events except a kids’ movement workshop were recorded; I’m including them here. They are all worth a watch or two, with engaging scientists talking interspersed with great musicians performing. Together they add up to more than seven hours, so take your time! I’m listing them in the order of the day, but if you want the general overview, skip down to “The Future of Music and the Mind” (but that is the only one without a musical performance).

Continue reading

When is the Brain “Mature”?

In the New York state budget just passed by Albany, legislators will raise the age to be tried as an adult from 16 to 18 years. New York was one of only two states left in the US that prosecuted youth as adults when they turned 16–now North Carolina stands on its own.

Maturity Briefing Paper image.jpg

Photo credit: Shutterstock

In the US, law and policy have struggled to determine an accurate age to judge people mature and accountable, but new scientific findings regarding the brain, adolescence, and neurodevelopment counter the idea that we can pinpoint one age for everyone.

Continue reading

Brainworks Video Nominated for 2017 Emmy Award

Last year, the Dana Foundation partnered with Eric Chudler, Ph.D., from the University of Washington to produce a video to educate kids about the wonders of neuroscience, and just last week, it was nominated for a 2017 Northwest Emmy Award!

Chudler is the executive director of the university’s Center for Sensorimotor Neural Engineering, and as the host and executive producer of “Brainworks: Exercise and the Brain,” he leads students through various experiments and a meeting with molecular biologist John J. Medina, Ph.D., to learn more about the cognitive benefits of exercise. To watch the video in full, see below:

 

 

Upcoming Brain Events in New York City

baw-2017

This year’s Brain Awareness Week (BAW) was another success with over 850 registered events worldwide (including 42 countries and 44 states)! We spoke with BAW partners from Korea, Israel, and the US, and went to the Rubin Museum of Art in NYC to learn more about perception with their Brainwave series. For those of you living in the NYC area, if you weren’t able to attend any local events, it’s not too late!

Continue reading

DIY Brain Awareness Week Arts and Crafts

As you look toward Brain Awareness Week next month (March 13-19), think about joining lab tours and lectures, but also consider art contests and brain hats. Why not infuse your Brain Awareness Week celebration with a little Do-It-Yourself arts and crafts?

baw_salvadorbrazil2015

A video of how to knit a brain hat popped up in my Facebook feed a few weeks ago, and were I a knitter, I’d surely be sporting one come March 13. This project will take some commitment, but will undoubtedly impress fellow neuroscience-enthusiasts. By Studio Knit, the five-minute video explains what you’ll need and gives step-by-step directions. What color would you choose for your brain hat?

Continue reading

%d bloggers like this: