Only One Week Left for Sticker Design Entries

It’s the last week of October, which means it’s time to prepare for Halloween costumes and free candy—It also means there is just one week left to submit your artwork for the Brain Awareness Week (BAW) Sticker Design Contest!

The brainy challenge launched in September to ask people of all ages to create their own graphic in hopes of becoming the new BAW 2018 sticker. A great assortment of prizes are in store for the top three winners, in addition to the first place design being printed into thousands of stickers for distribution in March!

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Some prizes for top finalists shown above.

The design must include the words “Brain Awareness Week 2018,” but all other elements are left up to the artist. Entries must be emailed as both a JPEG and PDF file (minimum of 300 dpi) to bawcontest@dana.org. The deadline is Halloween, or October 31st.

Once all design submissions have been received, five finalists will be selected by Dana Foundation staff. After that, voting will be open to the public to choose the top three finalists. Contest winners will be publicly announced in mid-December.

Good luck!

Submission Deadline: Sticker Design Contest

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Want to see your art distributed on thousands of stickers for the global Brain Awareness Week (BAW) campaign? We’re calling on creatives from around the world to come up with their own design that captures the spirit of the annual campaign. BAW kicks off in March and continues to inspire people from all continents to spread awareness on brain health and the progress of neuroscience research. However, entries to the Sticker Design Contest are due at the end of this month–so there are just over three weeks left!

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New Sticker Design Contest for Brain Awareness Week

Fall is here and with it comes a brand new brainy competition for people of all ages! Whether you’re known to have a flair for creativity or simply want to try something new this season, the Brain Awareness Week (BAW) Sticker Design Contest gives everyone a shot at seeing their art become the new BAW sticker for 2018!

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2017 Brain Awareness Video Contest Winners

The winners of the 2017 Brain Awareness Video Contest have been announced! Every year, the Society of Neuroscience (SfN) hosts the Brain Awareness Video Contest that anyone can enter by working with an SfN member to produce an educational video on the brain. The topics are broad and the execution of the videos diverse and creative.

The first place winner, Alison Caldwell, uses her video to answer the question, “What Are Optogenetics?” In the video, she discusses how scientists can “control” the brain using light by manipulating neurons’ action potential–the key to how neurons communicate. Discoveries using optogenetics range from better understanding how the brain processes time to figuring out some of the circuits involved in movement disorders such as Parkinson’s disease. [Read more about this exciting field in our news article and Capitol Hill Briefing video, both from 2015.]


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Sound Health: Music and the Mind

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Kennedy Center for the Arts have teamed up to explore the connections among music, the brain, and human wellness. The idea for the “Sound Health” partnership came up in conversations between NIH director Francis Collins and renowned soprano and Kennedy Center artistic advisor Renée Fleming. In March NIH hosted a science workshop, where researchers shared what they know about sound and sense with Fleming and other musicians, scientists, and music therapists. This past weekend, they moved to the Kennedy Center for a shared performance with the National Symphony Orchestra and a day of talk and music-making for the general public.

Bone flute from Geissenklösterle, a cave in Germany. Photo by José-Manuel Benito Álvarez

“Music is a critical part in understanding how the brain works,” Collins said on Friday. It’s likely that early people made music before developing formal language–we’ve found  flutes that are more than 35,000 years old. “It’s critical to understanding” how the oldest circuits in our brains work, and it can add “new and stronger scientific basis” to the range of techniques that music therapists use to help people recover from stroke, trauma, chronic pain, and other maladies.

All the Saturday events except a kids’ movement workshop were recorded; I’m including them here. They are all worth a watch or two, with engaging scientists talking interspersed with great musicians performing. Together they add up to more than seven hours, so take your time! I’m listing them in the order of the day, but if you want the general overview, skip down to “The Future of Music and the Mind” (but that is the only one without a musical performance).

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