Dana Alliance Members in Conversation: A Q&A with Eric Nestler

We spoke to neuroscientist and former Society for Neuroscience president Eric J. Nestler, M.D., Ph.D., about the bipartisan nature of biomedical research, his hopes for the future of addiction and depression, new findings on stress and depression, and more in the latest Dana Alliance member Q&A. These Q&As are part of a regular series of in-depth interviews that give readers a look into the outreach, research, and interests of the preeminent neuroscientists that make up the Dana Alliance for Brain Initiatives.

On why his institution, the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, prioritizes outreach, Nestler said:

Continue reading

The Dana Alliance for Brain Initiatives Celebrates its 25th Anniversary

DABI_25_Anniversary

President George Bush designated the 1990s as the “Decade of the Brain” to “enhance public awareness of the benefits to be derived from brain research.” Yet, in the early 90s, even with this presidential proclamation, there was not much information about the brain available to the general public. Outreach was still uncommon and neuroscience funding had even decreased.

In response, thirty of the United States’ preeminent neuroscientists met at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) to discuss the progress and promise of brain research. Led by James D. Watson, Ph.D., co-discoverer of the structure of DNA, and David Mahoney, Dana Foundation chairman at the time, attendees of the meeting vowed to change the landscape of public support for neuroscience. Shortly after, those scientists became founding members of the Dana Alliance for Brain Initiatives (DABI), an organization comprised of neuroscientists dedicated to advancing public awareness about the progress and promise of brain research. On this day in 1993, the creation of DABI was announced at a press conference in Washington, DC.

press-conference.jpeg

From left: W. Maxwell Cowan, James Watson, Guy McKhann, and David Mahoney announce the creation of DABI at a press conference in Washington, D.C.

Continue reading

Dana Press Offers Cerebrum Anthology 2017

anthology cover

When the cardboard cartons containing Cerebrum: Emerging Ideas in Brain Science 2018 arrived at our offices in midtown Manhattan a few weeks ago, pulling them out for the first time felt a bit like the birth of a new child. And like a newborn baby, each of the five anthology’s I’ve edited since coming to the Dana Foundation has its own look, personality, and distinct characteristics.

Let’s start with the look. The provocative cover is the work of J.F. Potevin, a French born, California-based artist whose work has appeared on the covers of Scientific American and Discover magazines. The cover also includes a complete list of contributors, many of them among the most distinguished neuroscientists in their research areas: Helen Mayberg on imaging, Beth Stevens on microglia, and Alvaro Pascual-Leone on deep brain stimulation, for example.

Continue reading

Newly Translated Graphic Novel Tells the Life Story of Nobel Prize Winning Neuroscientist

“Life does not end with death. What you pass on to others remains. Immortality is not the body, which will one day die. That does not matter… of importance is the message you leave to others. That is immortality,” said founding European Dana Alliance for the Brain (EDAB) member Rita Levi-Montalcini, winner of the 1986 Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine for the discovery of nerve growth factor.

While Levi-Montalcini died in 2012, her legacy continues to live on through her contributions to neuroscience; the European Brain Research Institute (EBRI), which she founded in 2002; and now through a free graphic novel, “Rita Levi-Montalcini: A Pioneer in Neuroscience.” Produced by The Senato della Republica and EBRI, with support from EDAB, the graphic novel tells the story of how Levi-Montalcini overcame gender and religious discrimination in World War II Italy to become one of neuroscience’s most accomplished researchers.

Continue reading

Science Communication: Dana Resources

In the past decade, I’ve seen more and more scientists step outside their labs—or invite people in—to share how science affects our daily lives and why basic and translational research is important. Spreading the science love isn’t just the purview of reporters and PR people anymore, and interest is high.

Groups like the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) have included plenty of sessions on science communication in past years, including workshops to help researchers hone their “elevator pitches” and find compelling stories in their data. In 2017, both the International Neuroethics Society and the Society for Neuroscience (SfN) included scicomm sessions during their annual meetings. I couldn’t even get into one of the workshops at SfN because it was so popular the room was already packed before the session started, with a standby line down the hall! (See also video of SfN’s 2017 “Dialogues” chat, with Pulitzer Prize-winning author and physician Siddartha Mukherjee chatting with SfN President Eric Nestler about “the excitement and importance of communicating the promise of scientific inquiry to the public.”)

Since part of the Dana Foundation’s mission is educating the public in a responsible manner about brain science and the potential of research, we’re glad to see this trend. Here are a few of our resources to help you reach out.

Continue reading

%d bloggers like this: