New K-5 Lesson Plans Now Available

New lesson plans about the brain are now available for teachers and students!  Each lesson plan has an accompanying PowerPoint presentation for students and an interactive activity that allows them to get hands-on with how the brain works. The lesson plans also include student objectives and background information, and are paired with relevant Dana Alliance fact sheets (for 3rd to 5th grade students).

Michigan State University_ArtsabndCrafts

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National Health Education Week

This week, join the celebration for National Health Education Week (October 16-20)! The weeklong campaign, sponsored by the Society for Public Health Education (SOPHE), first began in 1995 as an effort to direct national attention towards public health issues and promote a general understanding of the role health education plays in our everyday lives.

Not sure where to start? Each day this week, SOPHE is providing a series of themed events online and on social media to open up discussions on health education, community events, and the impact of advocacy. Public participation is encouraged, and don’t forget to use #NHEW.

As another organization committed to educating the public about brain health and the latest in scientific research, the Dana Foundation offers a vast amount of free, lay-friendly publications and resources year-round, encouraging people of all ages to better understand the brain.

Health Education Month image_orange

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Honoring Our Colleague Dr. Barbara Rich

This week marks the one year anniversary of the loss of our colleague and friend, Barbara Rich, Ed.D., who led our communications department for more than twenty years. To honor her memory, we are pleased to announce that we are joining her daughter, Marla Hassner, in the endowment of a new “Barbara Rich Award for Social Justice” at her alma mater, the City College of New York (CCNY). This award will be given every spring to “an outstanding graduating senior at CCNY who (1) has demonstrated talent in the study and practical pursuit of social justice and (2) has demonstrated the potential to be a social justice leader in their career.”

A plaque bearing the names of the recipients will be displayed at the college’s Colin Powell School for Civic and Global Leadership. It will read:

Barbara Rich was a proud alumna of the City College of New York who, beginning as a student activist and continuing throughout her life, fought for social justice and equality, and defended the civil rights of all people. At CCNY she worked on the college newspaper and challenged those who would limit free speech and restrict personal freedom. She went on to earn her doctorate from Columbia University, but always considered herself first a City College graduate. After a lengthy career in academia, Dr. Rich served as Executive Vice President at the Dana Foundation. She was an educator, a communicator, a leader, and an unyielding advocate for a more equal and just society.

Sound Health: Music and the Mind

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Kennedy Center for the Arts have teamed up to explore the connections among music, the brain, and human wellness. The idea for the “Sound Health” partnership came up in conversations between NIH director Francis Collins and renowned soprano and Kennedy Center artistic advisor Renée Fleming. In March NIH hosted a science workshop, where researchers shared what they know about sound and sense with Fleming and other musicians, scientists, and music therapists. This past weekend, they moved to the Kennedy Center for a shared performance with the National Symphony Orchestra and a day of talk and music-making for the general public.

Bone flute from Geissenklösterle, a cave in Germany. Photo by José-Manuel Benito Álvarez

“Music is a critical part in understanding how the brain works,” Collins said on Friday. It’s likely that early people made music before developing formal language–we’ve found  flutes that are more than 35,000 years old. “It’s critical to understanding” how the oldest circuits in our brains work, and it can add “new and stronger scientific basis” to the range of techniques that music therapists use to help people recover from stroke, trauma, chronic pain, and other maladies.

All the Saturday events except a kids’ movement workshop were recorded; I’m including them here. They are all worth a watch or two, with engaging scientists talking interspersed with great musicians performing. Together they add up to more than seven hours, so take your time! I’m listing them in the order of the day, but if you want the general overview, skip down to “The Future of Music and the Mind” (but that is the only one without a musical performance).

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Brain Awareness Week 2017 in Photos

Iran

A lecture demonstrating stereotaxic surgery on a rat, organized by Ferdowsi University of Mashhad in Iran.

Brain Awareness Week (BAW) has come and gone and now is the time to reflect on the success and reach of BAW partners’ efforts. Impressively, there are more than 800 events on the BAW Calendar of Events! Perhaps the best way to see the success of the campaign is to check out the BAW Photo Gallery.

Virginia

Minds games at Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute’s Brain School.

The photo gallery reflects the international nature of BAW, a global campaign with more than half of the events during the week occurring outside the US. From Germany to Australia, Brazil to Nigeria, Canada to Spain, partners coordinated events from all reaches of the globe. For BAW 2017, there were events in 40 countries and 46 US states!

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