National Stuttering Awareness Week: May 13-19

In 1988, an act of Congress established National Stuttering Awareness Week. This year, the observance runs from May 13-19, and is geared towards getting the 70 million people worldwide who stutter to “speak out, fluently or not” and to help spread more information about the communication disorder. In the US, about three million people are affected; many have struggled with the disorder since childhood, when it often first develops.

May Stuttering Awareness Week Stat - IG-01

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National Eating Disorders Awareness Week: Feb. 25-Mar. 3

Today marks the first day of National Eating Disorders Awareness Week, an observance created by the National Eating Disorders Association (NEDA) in order to spread awareness about eating disorders and support for those dealing with them. According to NEDA, approximately 20 million women and 10 million men will suffer from an eating disorder at some point in their lives. Different studies show varying degrees of prevalence of what is classified as a mental illness, but the fact remains that eating disorders are common and, while not always thought to be the case, profoundly dangerous. Although they may not be considered to be one of the more “serious” mental illnesses, eating disorders have the highest mortality rate out of any mental illness, with anorexia nervosa being the deadliest among them all.

Cynthia Bulik, Ph.D., founding director of the UNC Center of Excellence for Eating Disorders, which has recently been designated as the National Center of Excellence by SAMHSA. Photo courtesy of Cynthia Bulik.

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Community Neuroscience: How to Write About Neuroscience

Want to learn the do’s and dont’s of communicating neuroscience? Tune in to the fifth episode of Community Neuroscience, and find out! We interview Kayt Sukel, an accomplished science writer whose essays and articles have appeared in The Atlantic Monthly, New Scientist, The Washington Post, Pacific Standard, National Geographic, Science, Memory & Cognition, and more. She has written a number of articles for the Dana Foundation (the most recent one on treatment outcomes for post-traumatic stress disorder) and is well-versed in reporting hard science with accuracy. Watch the video below for tips on how to make complex brain research understandable for lay audiences.

Want to learn even more about turning scientific jargon into lay-friendly prose? Grab a copy of Jane Nevins’ You’ve Got Some Explaining to Do, published by the Dana Press. In case you missed an earlier episode of this series, not to worry! They are all up on the Dana Foundation YouTube channel.

Community Neuroscience: How to Teach Brain Science to Kids

In the newest episode of our “Community Neuroscience” video series, Eric Chudler, Ph.D., offers his advice on how to make neuroscience fun and engaging to young kids. Chudler is executive director of the Center for Neurotechnology at the University of Washington, where he conducts research related to how the brain processes information from the senses. Outside of the lab, he works with teachers to develop educational materials to help K-12 students learn about the brain and its functions and has been involved in neuroscience outreach for more than 20 years.

In addition to his longtime running Neuroscience For Kids website, Chudler’s most recent outreach endeavor is a video series called “BrainWorks” (produced with partner support from the Dana Foundation). The second episode, on exercise and the brain, landed him a Northwest Emmy Award!


Check back for next week’s episode, featuring two outreach all-stars from the west coast who created their own robust, neuroscience non-profit to excite young people about science, art, and learning about the brain.

Community Neuroscience: How to Organize a Brain Fair

The second episode of our new “Community Neuroscience” series is now up on the Dana Foundation YouTube channel! In this video, Dana Alliance for Brain Initiatives member Michael Burman, Ph.D., offers tips on how to organize a successful brain fair for the public. Burman is an associate professor at the University of New England (UNE), as well as Neuroscience K-12 Outreach Coordinator at its Center for Excellence in the Neurosciences.

Over the years, Burman has helped lead public outreach efforts to inspire his community about the brain. The hallmark activity at UNE is their annual Brain Fair, where more than 600 kids, teens, and adults can take part in interactive exhibits to learn about memory, the senses, addiction, brain injuries, and more. You can read more about him and his approach in this past Dana Foundation blog interview.


Stay tuned for next week’s video, which will feature an Emmy-award winning guest with advice on how to talk about neuroscience to elementary school kids.

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