Brain Game Setback

cere_110114_article_featTwo years ago we published a Cerebrum article, “The Brain Games Conundrum: Does Cognitive Training Really Sharpen the Mind?” Complicating the issue for our co-authors, Walter R. Boot and Arthur F. Kramer—both neuroscientists who had spent years studying cognitive psychology, neuroscience, and aging—were two open letters to the neuroscience community from more than one-hundred scientists, one objecting to effectiveness claims made by brain-game companies and the other a rebuttal saying brain training has a solid scientific base.

Near the end of a Q&A with Boot and Kramer following the article’s publication, Boot predicted that “maybe in ten years we might know enough to make more definitive recommendations.”

Boot’s prediction was reaffirmed earlier this week with the publishing of a comprehensive evaluation of the scientific literature on brain games in the journal Psychological Science in the Public Interest. Seven scientists, including Boot, reviewed more than 130 studies of brain games and other forms of cognitive training. The evaluation included studies of products from industry giant Lumosity.

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New Cerebrum Podcast: The Human Connectome Project

In our September Cerebrum article, “The Human Connectome Project: Progress and Prospects,” David Van Essen, Ph.D., and Matthew Glasser, Ph.D., write about an ambitious six-year collaboration between neuroscientists at various institutions to map the brain with the help of 1,200 volunteers and ever evolving magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technology. In this new podcast, the pair discuss their role, some of the unexpected surprises, and what they hope to discover in the project’s next phase.

Dana Launches New Cerebrum Podcast


For almost a year, we’ve featured the authors of our monthly Cerebrum articles in a Q & A. With the May Cerebrum article, “A New Approach for Epilepsy,” we are transitioning to a podcast.

Why are we taking this new approach? We suspect that visitors to the website, with already quite a bit to read, will welcome an audio option. We also think it will be valuable to hear some of the top researchers in the field offer their opinions and explain some of the complex biological, neurochemical, or genetic advances that they write about in Cerebrum, the Dana Foundation’s research-based publication.

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Dana News E-Blast: May

Here are some stories recently posted on

cere_spot_0416_contImaging the Neural Symphony

Two-photon microscopy allows scientists to peer farther into the brain than ever before. Karel Svoboda, Ph.D., describes the advances that led to this remarkable breakthrough—one that is helping scientists better understand neural networks. From Cerebrum, our online magazine of ideas.

Team Science

By sharing information and combining data on psychiatric disorders, “we’re starting to nail down some real findings—reliable genetic associations that are meaningful, consistent, and measurable,” says one researcher.

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Dana Press Offers Cerebrum Anthology 2015

CerebrumBookCover15In the last ten years, we have learned more about neuroscience than in all of recorded history, writes Alan Leshner in the Foreword of the new Cerebrum: Emerging Ideas in Brain Science 2015, an anthology that became available in paperback this week. Leshner, chief executive officer, emeritus, of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and former executive publisher of the journal Science, comes to that conclusion based on his 40 years in the neuroscience field.

The anthology consists of articles and book reviews featured each month during 2015 on the web. As the editor of Cerebrum, the online research-based journal published by the Dana Foundation, I’m confident that this year’s stories are examples of that kind of progress. Our goal is to take complex research and explain its importance in simple and understandable language to anyone interested in the brain.

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