Official Brain Awareness Week Hashtags

Are you ready for Brain Awareness Week? With less than one week left before it begins, there are still plenty of ways to get involved.

The global campaign takes place every March, but the evolving ideas, growing number of partners, and new ways to share information continue to make each year a little different. Social media plays a huge role in how the world sees the creative ways our partners around the world are sharing information about the brain. Not to mention, it’s a great way to recap the day’s events, in case you missed anything. When sharing anything about Brain Awareness Week (including your #HealthyBrainChallenge posts), be sure to use the official hashtags: #BrainWeek  #BrainAwarenessWeek

 

With so much happening all at once during the week, we want to help you stay up-to-date with all the amazing work our partners are doing to provide fun and informative events to the public (most of which are free!).

Join the Healthy Brain Challenge

healthybrainchallenge
As we gear up for Brain Awareness Week 2019, the global campaign to increase awareness of the progress and benefits of brain science, we challenge you to share how YOU live a brain healthy life. The Healthy Brain Challenge begins March 11, and anyone can participate!

Here’s how it works:

Do you play board games to challenge your mind? Maybe you exercise and participate in social gatherings three times a week. If so, you are already part of the challenge! Post a picture on Instagram, Twitter, or Facebook showing ways that you lead a brain healthy life. Tag your post with #healthybrainchallenge during March 11-17, and your photo may get featured on our social media.

Be sure to follow us on Instagram (@danafoundation), Facebook (The Dana Foundation) and Twitter (@dana_fdn), where we will post seven healthy tips (one for each day of Brain Awareness Week) on how you can lead a brain healthy life.

Visit dana.org/baw to look up events in your area and for more information on Brain Awareness Week.

Laugh Out Loud Neuroscience

Contrary to popular belief, scientists are just like the rest of us. They complain about their jobs, they like to joke around, and they tend to tell anyone who will listen about their work. Shannon Odell, a neuroscience Ph.D. candidate at Weill Cornell Medicine, writes and stars in “Your Brain On [Blank]” videos, a series that combines comedy and neuroscience to dispel the myth that her brainy teachers and classmates are not fundamentally different from anyone else.

The videos are produced by Inverse, a San Francisco-based digital media company that covers topics such as technology, science, and culture. The company’s website says that Odell’s series has received 75 million hits, including more than 400,000 through Facebook alone.

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Community Neuroscience: How to Write About Neuroscience

Want to learn the do’s and dont’s of communicating neuroscience? Tune in to the fifth episode of Community Neuroscience, and find out! We interview Kayt Sukel, an accomplished science writer whose essays and articles have appeared in The Atlantic Monthly, New Scientist, The Washington Post, Pacific Standard, National Geographic, Science, Memory & Cognition, and more. She has written a number of articles for the Dana Foundation (the most recent one on treatment outcomes for post-traumatic stress disorder) and is well-versed in reporting hard science with accuracy. Watch the video below for tips on how to make complex brain research understandable for lay audiences.

Want to learn even more about turning scientific jargon into lay-friendly prose? Grab a copy of Jane Nevins’ You’ve Got Some Explaining to Do, published by the Dana Press. In case you missed an earlier episode of this series, not to worry! They are all up on the Dana Foundation YouTube channel.

Community Neuroscience: How to Build an Outreach Organization

The latest episode of Community Neuroscience is out and all about how to build an outreach organization from the ground up. Neuroscientist Bill Griesar, Ph.D., and artist Jeff Leake, M.F.A., are faculty members of Portland State University’s psychology department, and together they are the brains behind NW Noggin (Northwest Neuroscience Outreach Group: Growing in Networks).

Founded in 2012, the arts-influenced outreach group is a volunteer-based nonprofit organization with a mission to turn kids on to the wonders of neuroscience. Bill and Jeff have since traveled all across the country to schools, displaced youth shelters, correctional facilities, and even the White House to promote learning about the brain. You can learn more about them and their work in a past Dana Blog interview.

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