Brain Awareness Week 2017: New Downloadable Materials

Brain Awareness Week 2017 (March 13-19) is approaching and new materials are now available for both adults and kids on the Brain Awareness Week (BAW) website! The fact sheets are easy for BAW partners to print and distribute and provide an easy way to disseminate concise information on the brain to a broad audience. The Dana Alliance’s newly translated materials are particularly useful for international BAW partners.

Brain Briefs on “The Senses” (“Vision”, “Hearing” and “Smell & Taste”) are now available in Spanish, Portuguese, French, Italian and German on the Downloadable Materials for Adults page! They provide information on how the senses work, how perception happens at the neurological level, and address problems that can arise, such as hearing loss from loud noises, vision loss in the aging eye, and decline in smell and taste as we age and due to illness. In addition, there are fact sheets that answer common questions about the brain based on Q&A: Answering Your Questions About the Brain translated into Spanish, Portuguese, French, Italian and German. There are also three new versions of the new “What is Brain Awareness Week?” animation, featuring translations in French, Portuguese, and Spanish:

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Alzheimer’s: Every Minute Counts

In the United States, someone is diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease every minute; around the world, it’s every four seconds. “It is the biggest epidemic we have in this country,” says Harvard University’s Rudolph Tanzi, “I’m shocked that people aren’t panicked about what this disease is going to do to the country or to their families.”

This Wednesday (January 25) at 10 pm ET, PBS is premiering “Alzheimer’s: Every Minute Counts,” an urgent wake-up call about the national threat posed by the disease. The documentary includes interviews with doctors, caregivers, and longtime researchers of the disease, such as Dana Alliance member Tanzi.

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National Drug & Alcohol Facts Week: Jan. 23-29

Every year, the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) creates initiatives to raise awareness about drug and alcohol abuse in the US. Today, until January 29, is officially “National Drug and Alcohol Facts Week,” an annual health observance that links students with scientists and other experts to offset false information about drugs and alcohol that is widely circulated from the internet, social media, TV, movies, music, and friends. Among the many events taking place this week, Thursday the 26th is Chat Day, where students can go online and ask NIDA scientists about drugs and drug abuse.

On December 13, the 2016 results of NIDA’s “Monitoring the Future” (MTF) were released. The annual survey has been tracking drug, alcohol, and cigarette use among 8th, 10th, and 12th graders nationwide since 1975. According to the study:

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Dana newsletter: January

Below is the latest Dana email newsletter. You can sign up to receive this (and other Dana email alerts and/or print publications) by going here.


deutch-rop-jan2017-80pFinding Clues to Schizophrenia Outside Neurons

by Ariel Y. Deutch, Ph.D.

The recent discovery of key roles of non-neuronal cells such as microglia in the development of schizophrenia opens the door to the development of new types of therapies for an illness for which we need far better treatments. One in our series of scientists’ Reports on Progress.

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New Paper: Incorporating Sex Influences into Today’s Brain Research

Historically, most medical research has used male subjects (human and animal) and tissues, but recently there has been a notable increase in the acceptance of the need to incorporate sex influences into brain research. in 2014, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) mandated that all future biomedical research funded by the agency include sex differences.

But two years after the NIH passed its mandate, the research community continues to debate how best to address sex as a biological variable.

Why not just introduce female subjects to the studies, you might wonder, but it’s not that simple, as Jill Goldstein, director of research at the Connors Center for Women’s Health and Gender Biology at Brigham and Women’s Hospital explains in our new briefing paper:

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