Enjoy the Fireworks, but Protect Your Ears!

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Nothing says Fourth of July like outdoor cookouts and fireworks overhead. Illuminating the sky with a grand display has been an annual tradition for as long as we can remember, since John Adams wished it to be part of the festivities even before signing the Declaration of Independence.

While we encourage everyone to take part in the celebration, it’s important to remember to take precautions to protect your hearing. In a study published last year, the Centers for Disease Control said that nearly one in every four Americans suffer from temporary or permanent noise-induced hearing loss.

“Hearing loss is the third most common chronic physical condition in the United States and is twice as prevalent as diabetes or cancer,” the authors report. It is a significant, often unrecognized health problem among adults in the US that can be associated with decreased social, psychological, and cognitive functioning if left untreated.

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Gladwell Podcasts Examine Brain Issues

Dana_podcastIMAGE_finalAs neuroscience enthusiasts already know, there are countless podcasts out there about brain-related topics. To inform my Cerebrum podcasts, I’ve sampled many of them to pick up tips on how to explain research that can often be complex and difficult to understand.

One such podcast that does a masterful job of explaining both chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) and false memory is Revisionist History, a podcast by Malcolm Gladwell, a former New Yorker staff writer and the author of Tipping Point, Blink, and other New York Times best seller nonfiction works. The podcast labels itself as a “journey through the overlooked and misunderstood.”

The CTE episode, entitled “Burden of Proof,” focuses on Owen Thomas, a captain of the University of Pennsylvania football team who committed suicide several years ago. Gladwell builds the episode from a talk on the topic of “proof” that he gave to students at Penn in 2013. He used CTE, a neurodegenerative disease found in people who have had multiple head injuries, to make his point.

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From the Archives: Seeking to Stem Suicide

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Nearly 45,000 people in the US kill themselves each year (probably an underestimate, given the stigma still attaching to suicide), and there may be 25 attempts for each death, according to the US Centers for Disease Control & Prevention. A news story we published in January reported on a few of the many avenues of research trying to help doctors and caregivers predict who is at risk and how to better help them.

“Suicide is one of the few medical conditions in which the doctor and patient have different goals—the patient may be highly motivated not to reveal what he or she is thinking,” psychiatrist Maria Oquendo says in the story. “We need biological markers so we can identify those at risk.”

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International Neuroethics Society Essay Contest

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Submissions are being accepted through July 9 for the International Neuroethics Society’s (INS) Student/Postdoc Essay Contest in Neuroethics. The contest aims to promote interest in neuroethics among students and postdocs from around the world.

Those looking to enter can submit in one of two categories: academic or science communication.

From the INS website:

One winner from each category will be selected by the INS Student/Postdoc Committee in August and recognized at the 2018 INS Annual Meeting in San Diego—the premier gathering of professionals dedicated to neuroethics. Winners will also receive a free 1-year INS student membership and a Michael Patterson Travel Stipend ($250 USD) to support travel expenses to the meeting.

In addition, up to five authors of science communication essays will also be selected to participate in a 1-on-1 editorial mentorship with INS Chief Operating Officer Elaine Snell and INS Board member Mo Costandi, co-chairs of the INS Communication, Outreach, and Membership Committee. The winning essays and those selected for the mentoring opportunity will be considered for publication by the INS or by another institution appropriate for the topic discussed.

For additional details on eligibility, topics, and how to submit, visit the INS website. Good luck!

Summer 2018 Brainy Reading List

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Summer is finally here! In celebration, we’ve put together a list of seven brainy books, authored by members of the Dana Alliance for Brain Initiatives (DABI) or prominent neuroscientists, for you to grab on your way to enjoy the warm weather and sunshine:

The Consciousness Instinct: Unraveling the Mystery of How the Brain Makes the Mind by DABI member Michael S. Gazzaniga, Ph.D., Farrar, Straus and Giroux

The Consciousness Instinct is a fun and informative read about a topic that is often written about in ways that are either boring or incomprehensible. Gazzaniga was one of the first scientists in modern times to dare talk about consciousness. He’s been at it for five decades, and keeps coming up with new and interesting ideas. Your consciousness will be raised.
― DABI member Joseph E. LeDoux, Ph.D., New York University

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