Cerebrum Podcasts Feature Top Neuroscientists

CerebrumLogo_FINALSince May of 2016, I’ve had the good fortune to interview the authors of our monthly Cerebrum articles for a podcast. Why a podcast? We suspect that visitors to Dana Foundation website—with already quite a bit to read—would welcome an audio option. We also thought it would be valuable to hear some of the top researchers in the field offer their opinions and explain some of the complex advances and public policy issues that they write about in Cerebrum, the Dana Foundation’s magazine-style series.

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From the Archives: Circadian Rhythms

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Image: Shutterstock

This year’s Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine was awarded to three men who did basic research, discovering molecular mechanisms that control the circadian rhythm. The discoveries by Jeffrey C. Hall, Michael Rosbash and Michael W. Young “explain how plants, animals and humans adapt their biological rhythm so that it is synchronized with the Earth’s revolutions,” write the Nobel committee.

They and other researchers have continued to add details to our understanding of this critical system. In a story for Cerebrum in 2014, Paolo Sassone-Corsi described two relatively new areas of research: circadian genomics and epigenomics:

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Summer 2017 Brainy Reading List

Summer is finally here! We have eight brainy book suggestions, all written by members of the Dana Alliance for Brain Initiatives (DABI) or prominent neuroscientists, to take to the pool, beach, or wherever you enjoy a little bit of sun:

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2017 World Science Festival

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The World Science Festival celebrates its tenth anniversary this year and is once again offering a great series of programs. From May 30 to June 4 in New York City, you can attend events ranging from a trivia night on mummies to a panel talk on the biggest questions in cosmology.

Of course, we’re most interested in the brain-related events, and they don’t disappoint. On Wednesday, May 31, psychologists and neuroscientists will tackle creativity and artificial intelligence–can computers be creative? Friday, June 2, a panel will explore brain development and the roots of human social connections. On the last day of the festival, attendees will hear an update on the Human Connectome Project. Two Dana Alliance for Brain Initiatives members will present at this event: neurobiologist David Van Essen, author of a 2016 Cerebrum article on the connectome, and developmental neurobiologist Jeff W. Lichtman.

Tickets are on sale now and sell out quickly! And stay tuned for coverage of some of the events on this blog.

From the Archives: Imaging Depression

This month, Helen Mayberg and her colleagues published a study suggesting that patterns of brain connectivity may predict which people with depression would respond best to talk therapy and which would do better with a drug. This video clip from Fox5 Atlanta describes the study, and shows what it could mean to people who need help for their depression.

Our first work with Mayberg, now a member of the Dana Alliance for Brain Initiatives, was more than a decade ago, when she was using first positron emission tomography and then deep brain stimulation for treatment-resistant depression (Dana grants in 2006, 2010). She spoke with us about this work in 2012:

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