International Neuroethics Society Essay Contest

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Submissions are being accepted through July 9 for the International Neuroethics Society’s (INS) Student/Postdoc Essay Contest in Neuroethics. The contest aims to promote interest in neuroethics among students and postdocs from around the world.

Those looking to enter can submit in one of two categories: academic or science communication.

From the INS website:

One winner from each category will be selected by the INS Student/Postdoc Committee in August and recognized at the 2018 INS Annual Meeting in San Diego—the premier gathering of professionals dedicated to neuroethics. Winners will also receive a free 1-year INS student membership and a Michael Patterson Travel Stipend ($250 USD) to support travel expenses to the meeting.

In addition, up to five authors of science communication essays will also be selected to participate in a 1-on-1 editorial mentorship with INS Chief Operating Officer Elaine Snell and INS Board member Mo Costandi, co-chairs of the INS Communication, Outreach, and Membership Committee. The winning essays and those selected for the mentoring opportunity will be considered for publication by the INS or by another institution appropriate for the topic discussed.

For additional details on eligibility, topics, and how to submit, visit the INS website. Good luck!

Visit BrainFacts.org

If you follow our blog, you’re no doubt familiar with the print and video resources we offer about the brain. In this blog, we wanted to take a moment to recognize the wonderful offerings you can find on the website of a key Brain Awareness Week partner, the Society for Neuroscience (SfN).

On the newly relaunched BrainFacts.org, you can find a beginner’s guide to the brain and nervous system. Under eight neuroscience “core concepts,” you’ll receive an overview on everything from how neurons communicate, to the source of curiosity. A short (under two-minute) video accompanies each concept, along with an interactive activity and related reading.

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Credit: The Society for Neuroscience

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SfN Brain Awareness Video Contest Winners

The Society for Neuroscience has announced the winners of the 2015 Brain Awareness video contest. Anyone can enter and work with a member of the Society for Neuroscience in their area to produce an educational video about the brain.

The first place winner, Matthew Sugrim’s, video discusses our perception of color and poses the question: “Do We See The Same Red?” The video is a stunningly simple and colorful animation of the neurochemical process of sight, specifically how the brain turns photons into color. He insists that “it is complicated, but it’s not magic. Variations in the composition of cones in our eyes and the exact wiring of our brains may cause very slight variations in color perception.” Regardless, red really is the same red to everyone. Interestingly, many people have learned from the recent viral phenomenon of The Dress that lighting and color context can create much more variance in how people perceive color.

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Design a Brain Experiment 2014 Winners

We are pleased to announce our Design a Brain Experiment 2014 winners: First place goes to Gopika Hari, a junior from Cupertino High School, and second place to Nicole Werpachowski, a senior from BARD High School Early College Queens. While they hail from opposite coasts, Gopika from California and Nicole from New York, both share a passion for neuroscience, which was further encouraged by a high school course in psychology.

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Gopika Hari, Cupertino High School

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2014 Neuroscience for Kids Poetry Contest

February is National Poetry Month (you might remember we held a brain-themed poetry contest back in 2011) and the Neuroscience for Kids team at the University of Washington is holding its annual poetry contest. There are different categories for different ages, but kids from kindergarten through high school can enter. For example, grades six to eight must submit a haiku, with the example given:

Three pounds of jelly
wobbling around in my skull
and it can do math.

Check out the Neuroscience for Kids website for the rules and entry form.

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