Successful Aging & Your Brain PSA Available in Spanish!

¿Hablas español? ¿Quieres aprender más sobre el envejecimiento provechoso? Spanish speakers, you’re in luck! Our award-winning Successful Aging & Your Brain video has been translated into Spanish and is now available to view on our YouTube channel. Check it out to learn the four steps you can start taking today to help keep your brain healthy into old age, based on research by the Institute of Medicine. It’s never too late to start living a brain-healthy life!

Looking for more information on the brain in Spanish? Our Successful Aging & Your Brain Spanish page has many resources, including our translated Successful Aging & Your Brain booklet.

– Ali Chunovic

Brainworks Video Nominated for 2017 Emmy Award

Last year, the Dana Foundation partnered with Eric Chudler, Ph.D., from the University of Washington to produce a video to educate kids about the wonders of neuroscience, and just last week, it was nominated for a 2017 Northwest Emmy Award!

Chudler is the executive director of the university’s Center for Sensorimotor Neural Engineering, and as the host and executive producer of “Brainworks: Exercise and the Brain,” he leads students through various experiments and a meeting with molecular biologist John J. Medina, Ph.D., to learn more about the cognitive benefits of exercise. To watch the video in full, see below:

 

 

2017 NYC Regional Brain Bee Champions

For the first-place winner of this year’s Regional Brain Bee, biology was always the high school senior’s favorite subject in school. But it wasn’t until she was 14 years old that Winsome Ching narrowed her focus to neuroscience. After visiting a museum celebrating Austrian neurologist Sigmund Freud in Vienna, Ching was “hooked” by his theories on the brain, she says. Since then, she has transitioned from Freud’s psychoanalyses to the biological aspects of brain function.

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Ching’s passion for neuroscience shined through at the Brain Bee this past Saturday, along with her peers from 33 high schools spanning across Long Island, Westchester County, and New York City’s five boroughs. Half of Columbia University’s Alfred Lerner Hall was filled by a grid of white tables, adorned with the students’ name cards, directly facing the judges’ table; the other half was bustling with family members, friends, and teachers all gathered to cheer on the participating students. In the time before the competition began, students were scattered throughout the auditorium for one last chance to review notes and textbook chapters on the brain. Once all participants checked in, the competition began.

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Brain Awareness Week 2017: New Downloadable Materials

Brain Awareness Week 2017 (March 13-19) is approaching and new materials are now available for both adults and kids on the Brain Awareness Week (BAW) website! The fact sheets are easy for BAW partners to print and distribute and provide an easy way to disseminate concise information on the brain to a broad audience. The Dana Alliance’s newly translated materials are particularly useful for international BAW partners.

Brain Briefs on “The Senses” (“Vision”, “Hearing” and “Smell & Taste”) are now available in Spanish, Portuguese, French, Italian and German on the Downloadable Materials for Adults page! They provide information on how the senses work, how perception happens at the neurological level, and address problems that can arise, such as hearing loss from loud noises, vision loss in the aging eye, and decline in smell and taste as we age and due to illness. In addition, there are fact sheets that answer common questions about the brain based on Q&A: Answering Your Questions About the Brain translated into Spanish, Portuguese, French, Italian and German. There are also three new versions of the new “What is Brain Awareness Week?” animation, featuring translations in French, Portuguese, and Spanish:

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New Paper: Incorporating Sex Influences into Today’s Brain Research

Historically, most medical research has used male subjects (human and animal) and tissues, but recently there has been a notable increase in the acceptance of the need to incorporate sex influences into brain research. in 2014, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) mandated that all future biomedical research funded by the agency include sex differences.

But two years after the NIH passed its mandate, the research community continues to debate how best to address sex as a biological variable.

Why not just introduce female subjects to the studies, you might wonder, but it’s not that simple, as Jill Goldstein, director of research at the Connors Center for Women’s Health and Gender Biology at Brigham and Women’s Hospital explains in our new briefing paper:

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