Community Neuroscience: How to Organize a Brain Fair

The second episode of our new “Community Neuroscience” series is now up on the Dana Foundation YouTube channel! In this video, Dana Alliance for Brain Initiatives member Michael Burman, Ph.D., offers tips on how to organize a successful brain fair for the public. Burman is an associate professor at the University of New England (UNE), as well as Neuroscience K-12 Outreach Coordinator at its Center for Excellence in the Neurosciences.

Over the years, Burman has helped lead public outreach efforts to inspire his community about the brain. The hallmark activity at UNE is their annual Brain Fair, where more than 600 kids, teens, and adults can take part in interactive exhibits to learn about memory, the senses, addiction, brain injuries, and more. You can read more about him and his approach in this past Dana Foundation blog interview.


Stay tuned for next week’s video, which will feature an Emmy-award winning guest with advice on how to talk about neuroscience to elementary school kids.

Dana Foundation Launches Neuroscience Outreach Video Series

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To support and encourage people interested in building an organization or communicating brain science through events, teaching, or writing, the Dana Foundation today launches the first of five “Community Neuroscience” videos. The videos, between 5 and 12 minutes in length, will air weekly on the Dana Foundation YouTube channel starting January 16, leading up to Brain Awareness Week (March 11-17), an annual global event that promotes the promise and benefits of brain research.

Here is a summary of the topics and guests in the order they’ll air: Continue reading

Neuroscience and Society: Autism

When we’re trying to help people who have troubles due to autism spectrum disorders, one of the first challenges is definition: What does “autism” mean?

“Autism was and is still currently defined by behaviors,” Dana Alliance member Barry Gordon said, as researchers haven’t yet found solid biomarkers or other internal signals to identify it. “Whenever you read about autism, you might want to dig into what definitions they go into,” he said during a recent discussion at the American Academy for the Advancement of Sciences (AAAS) in Washington, DC.

Autism -Dawson - Oct2018Even definitions by behavior vary. For example, fellow presenter Daniel Geschwind said, problems with language used to be part of the diagnosis, but now doctors and other caregivers usually only count differences in social behavior and the presence of “repetitive-restrictive” behavior (like hand-flapping or always needing to do activities in the same order).

Continue reading

Free Public Event on Autism

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Autism is a mysterious and puzzling disorder. In 1943, American child psychiatrist Leo Kanner first published a paper describing 11 children who were highly intelligent but displayed “a powerful desire for aloneness” and “an obsessive insistence on persistent sameness.” He called this condition “early infantile autism.” Prior to that time, people with autism were simply called insane. Autism is now officially known as autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and, while there is a wide variation in the nature and severity of its signs, people with ASD typically have difficulty with social communication and interaction, restricted interests, and repetitive behaviors. Continue reading

Closed Captioning and Transcripts Now Available for Videos and Podcasts!

At the Dana Foundation, we strive to make credible and current information about the brain available to as many people as possible. As part of that effort, we have recently taken steps to make our materials accessible to people who are deaf or hard of hearing.

The majority of our YouTube videos are now closed captioned, including our Neuroscience and Society Series, public talks organized by AAAS and the Dana Foundation covering exciting topics in brain science such as architecture and the brain, truth and lying, and meditation. Our Cerebrum podcasts, which feature our Cerebrum editor in conversation with neuroscientists on topics such as the challenge of overcoming glioblastoma, how the human neocortex sets us apart, and Ketamine’s potential to effectively treat depression, now have accompanying transcripts.

Looking for one of our closed caption videos to start with? Check out our brand new Successful Aging and Your Brain On Demand video below to learn about how the brain works, brain diseases and disorders, and tips for leading a brain healthy lifestyle!

– Ali Chunovic

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