Global Mental Health and Neuroscience: Challenges and Opportunities

Sheckar Saxena at SfN, November 2016

Sheckar Saxena at SfN, November 2016

“When it comes to mental health, all countries are developing countries. A country that does not look after the treatment of more than 50 percent of people with depression living in that country, a country that allows a million people to stay in prisons when suffering from mental disorders, is it a country that can be called a developed country for mental disorders or mental health? You answer that.” –Shekhar Saxena, November 2016

This past August, Patricio V. Marquez and Shekhar Saxena wrote for Cerebrum on making mental health a global priority. This month, Saxena, a psychiatrist and director of the department of mental health and substance abuse at the World Health Organization, spelled out the challenges and opportunities during a discussion at the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience (SfN). Continue reading

International Neuroethics Society 2015 Meeting: The Rise of Mental Health Disorders

Guest blog by Carson Martinez, neuroscience student at New York University and intern for the International Neuroethics Society

INS IMAGEThe National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) reports that in 2013 the number of adults in the U.S. with a diagnosable mental disorder within the past year was nearly 1 in 5, or roughly 43 million people. The Institute also reported that almost 10 million American adults, 1 in 25, have serious functional impairment due to a mental illness, such as a psychosis or serious mood or anxiety disorder. These staggering numbers are on the rise not only in the U.S., but also globally. By the year 2020, it is projected that the global burden of mental health disorders will reach 15 percent, and common mental disorders will disable more people than problems arising from AIDS, heart disease, traffic accidents, and wars combined. As mental health issues become increasingly prevalent, there is an urgent need to better understand their ethical, legal, and societal implications, including increasing access to treatment, reducing stigmas, and implementing neuroscience research.

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