Eric Kandel is Alan Alda’s Podcast Guest

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Image courtesy of Alda Communication Training Co.

On the latest episode of the Clear + Vivid podcast, host Alan Alda, well-known actor, writer, and, in recent years, crusader of science outreach, sits down with old friend and Dana Alliance for Brain Initiatives member Eric R. Kandel, director of the Kavli Institute for Brain Science at Columbia University and author of The Disordered Mind: What Unusual Brains Tell Us About Ourselves. Kandel speaks to Alda about his work, the satisfaction of connecting with audiences, and fleeing Austria in the aftermath of its annexation to Nazi Germany.

The podcast focuses on communication and connection. It’s through conversations with individuals holding mastery in various fields that Alda guides the listener, stopping to appreciate peaks and valleys of the art form. In this, Alda and Nobel Laureate Kandel find and sustain a relaxed stride, offering listeners morsels of wisdom: The importance of being mindful of your audience, focusing on one person and changing your approach based on their responses (favorable or not); the role of laughter in forming connections; and the delicate dance of simplifying your ideas to a lay audience without treading on and distorting the science. Continue reading

European Dana Alliance Members Share Nobel in Medicine

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Credit: Kavli Institute for Systems Neuroscience

British-American researcher John O’Keefe and Norwegian researchers May-Britt Moser and Edvard I. Moser were awarded this year’s Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for discovering “an inner GPS, in the brain,” that makes navigation possible for virtually all creatures. The Mosers, members of the European Dana Alliance for the Brain, wrote on their research for Cerebrum in March: “Mapping Your Every Move.” Here’s Cerebrum editor Bill Glovin’s post on the essay from then: 

Earlier this week, a study published in the journal Neurology reported that Alzheimer’s disease may be killing more than 500,000 people in the U.S. each year, making it possibly the third leading killer behind heart disease and cancer. As Brain Awareness Week (March 10-16) approaches, it’s as good a time as any to take stock of whether neuroscience is getting closer to finding a treatment for Alzheimer’s disease.

E-MB-Moser-20100819While the Obama administration’s $100 million Brain Initiative and the European Union’s $1 billion Human Brain Project give us reasons to hope for the future, the research outlined in “Mapping Your Every Move,Cerebrum’s March feature, provides reason for optimism right now. Authors Edvard Moser, Ph.D., and May-Britt Moser, Ph.D. of the Kavli Institute in Norway are among a determined group of researchers worldwide who are making slow but steady progress in research that could lead to Alzheimer’s treatment.

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New Cerebrum: Working to Solve the Alzheimer’s Puzzle

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Credit: Kavli Institute for Systems Neuroscience

Earlier this week, a study published in the journal Neurology reported that Alzheimer’s disease may be killing more than 500,000 people in the U.S. each year, making it possibly the third leading killer behind heart disease and cancer. As Brain Awareness Week (March 10-16) approaches, it’s as good a time as any to take stock of whether neuroscience is getting closer to finding a treatment for Alzheimer’s disease.

Continue reading

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