2017 Brain Awareness Video Contest Winners

The winners of the 2017 Brain Awareness Video Contest have been announced! Every year, the Society of Neuroscience (SfN) hosts the Brain Awareness Video Contest that anyone can enter by working with an SfN member to produce an educational video on the brain. The topics are broad and the execution of the videos diverse and creative.

The first place winner, Alison Caldwell, uses her video to answer the question, “What Are Optogenetics?” In the video, she discusses how scientists can “control” the brain using light by manipulating neurons’ action potential–the key to how neurons communicate. Discoveries using optogenetics range from better understanding how the brain processes time to figuring out some of the circuits involved in movement disorders such as Parkinson’s disease. [Read more about this exciting field in our news article and Capitol Hill Briefing video, both from 2015.]


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Neuroscience Presented with Creative Flair

Creativity (2).jpgWith Brain Awareness Week just over one week away, there are all kinds of contests taking place to help spread the word about the importance of brain research. Some combine creative flair with neuroscience to produce impressive results!

Last September, we announced the winners of the 2015 Brain Awareness Video Contest, sponsored by the Society for Neuroscience (SfN). The contest asks participants to “explain a neuroscience concept so that a broad audience can understand the wonders of the brain and mind.” Continue reading

2015 Brain Awareness Reception at SfN

This year’s annual Brain Awareness Reception took place in Chicago’s massive McCormick Place on Saturday, as part of an eventful program created by the Society for Neuroscience (SfN). The main floor was filled with rows of more than 600 exhibitors, showcasing new tools, technologies, and publishing opportunities for communicating science. Meanwhile, the upstairs space was dedicated entirely to celebrating the work done by students, postdocs, scientists (several Dana Alliance members included), educators, and general brain enthusiasts who devote their time to public outreach efforts.

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Kathleen Roina, director of BAW (right), and Amanda Bastone (left) handing out free educational resources at the reception.

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SfN Brain Awareness Video Contest Winners

The Society for Neuroscience has announced the winners of the 2015 Brain Awareness video contest. Anyone can enter and work with a member of the Society for Neuroscience in their area to produce an educational video about the brain.

The first place winner, Matthew Sugrim’s, video discusses our perception of color and poses the question: “Do We See The Same Red?” The video is a stunningly simple and colorful animation of the neurochemical process of sight, specifically how the brain turns photons into color. He insists that “it is complicated, but it’s not magic. Variations in the composition of cones in our eyes and the exact wiring of our brains may cause very slight variations in color perception.” Regardless, red really is the same red to everyone. Interestingly, many people have learned from the recent viral phenomenon of The Dress that lighting and color context can create much more variance in how people perceive color.

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