New Method Reaches Deep in the Brain Without Surgery

A team of neuroscientists and engineers are working to develop a new form of treatment for people who have Parkinson’s disease, depression, or obsessive-compulsive disorder. According to a recent New York Times article, the available methods for treating these conditions currently involve the risks of surgery and can have limited ability with directing electrical pulses to the right areas of the brain.

Dana Alliance member Helen Mayberg, tells the Times:

They have this clever new way to deliver current[s] to a spot of interest deep in the brain and do it without invading the brain…If you didn’t have to actually open up somebody’s brain and put something in it, if it could do what we’re doing now just as well—sign me up.

So far the research has only been conducted in mice, but experts are hoping the technique will work for people, too. “This is something that many of us in the field have wished for for a long time,” says Alexander Rotenberg. Rotenberg is director of the neuromodulation program at Boston Children’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School. The article goes on to explain the details of the non-invasive treatment:

The method, called temporal interference, involves beaming different electric frequencies, too high for neurons to respond to, from electrodes on the skull’s surface. The team found that where the currents intersected inside the brain, the frequencies interfered with each other, essentially canceling out all but the difference between them and leaving a low-frequency current that neurons in that location responded to.

For more information on the experimental study, read the full article here.

– Seimi Rurup

Children’s Mental Health Awareness: OCD

Sunday, May 3rd to Saturday, May 9th is “Children’s Mental Health Awareness Week,” a national effort to raise awareness about the mental health needs of America’s youth. With obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) affecting an estimated 2.2 million American adults, the condition first surfaces during childhood or early adolescence. To learn more about OCD, we spoke with expert Judy Rapoport, M.D., who is chief of the child psychiatry branch at the National Institute of Mental Health and a Dana Alliance member.

It’s not uncommon to hear someone casually say they “have OCD” because they like to keep things organized in a certain way or follow some sort of ritual every day. What is the real distinction between someone who is particular and someone who is diagnosed with OCD?

rapoport headshotPeople diagnosed with OCD have habits or thoughts that significantly interfere with their functioning. For example, one patient may spend so much time, carrying out some other ritual that they are unable to go to work. Others are so preoccupied that they have an illness or that they have hurt someone that they can think or talk about little else. This is an important question, however, because there is a “dimension” of OCD, and there are some people whose habits are on the borderline of a disorder but they, and those around them, can manage with them. Continue reading

Steven Hyman Talks Drug Treatments for Mental Disorders

Dana Foundation Board member and Dana Alliance for Brain Initiatives member Steven Hyman, Ph.D., was interviewed by the Boston Globe yesterday. In the Q&A, Dr. Hyman, who is the director of the Stanley Center for Psychiatric Research at the Broad Institute, discusses the state of neuropsychopharmacology and the challenges involved in treating mental disorders such as schizophrenia, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and depression.

From the interview:

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