Meditation in Education

Can something as simple as designated quiet time for 15 minutes twice a day help struggling students perform better in school? After adopting this approach for three years, one school in a troubled area of San Francisco saw suspension rates drop by 79 percent, attendance rise 98 percent, and grade point averages increase.

Yesterday’s New York Times reported on this school and other studies in the Bay Area, which also showed encouraging results. While these types of studies are still in their infancy, schools around the country are jumping on the meditation train in search of a cost-effective ways to nurture healthier and more focused students.

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Image: Shutterstock

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New in Cerebrum: What Makes Me, Me?

Cerebrum-June-Indivuality

The question of how individual differences in behavior and personality develop—especially in terms of the interaction between genes and the environment—has proved to be a formidable challenge in neuroscience. In “One of a Kind: The Neurobiology of Individuality,” the featured Cerebrum article for June, Richard J. Davidson, Ph.D., impressively summarizes mounting new imaging evidence that suggests brain circuits involved in our emotional responses are highly plastic and change with experience, affecting our disposition. He also points to new research that suggests that psychological interventions can further harness brain plasticity to promote positive behavioral changes—changes that increase resilience, well-being, and altruistic behavior.

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