Community Neuroscience: How to Teach Brain Science to Kids

In the newest episode of our “Community Neuroscience” video series, Eric Chudler, Ph.D., offers his advice on how to make neuroscience fun and engaging to young kids. Chudler is executive director of the Center for Neurotechnology at the University of Washington, where he conducts research related to how the brain processes information from the senses. Outside of the lab, he works with teachers to develop educational materials to help K-12 students learn about the brain and its functions and has been involved in neuroscience outreach for more than 20 years.

In addition to his longtime running Neuroscience For Kids website, Chudler’s most recent outreach endeavor is a video series called “BrainWorks” (produced with partner support from the Dana Foundation). The second episode, on exercise and the brain, landed him a Northwest Emmy Award!


Check back for next week’s episode, featuring two outreach all-stars from the west coast who created their own robust, neuroscience non-profit to excite young people about science, art, and learning about the brain.

Brainworks Video Nominated for 2017 Emmy Award

Last year, the Dana Foundation partnered with Eric Chudler, Ph.D., from the University of Washington to produce a video to educate kids about the wonders of neuroscience, and just last week, it was nominated for a 2017 Northwest Emmy Award!

Chudler is the executive director of the university’s Center for Sensorimotor Neural Engineering, and as the host and executive producer of “Brainworks: Exercise and the Brain,” he leads students through various experiments and a meeting with molecular biologist John J. Medina, Ph.D., to learn more about the cognitive benefits of exercise. To watch the video in full, see below:

 

 

Neuroscience Presented with Creative Flair

Creativity (2).jpgWith Brain Awareness Week just over one week away, there are all kinds of contests taking place to help spread the word about the importance of brain research. Some combine creative flair with neuroscience to produce impressive results!

Last September, we announced the winners of the 2015 Brain Awareness Video Contest, sponsored by the Society for Neuroscience (SfN). The contest asks participants to “explain a neuroscience concept so that a broad audience can understand the wonders of the brain and mind.” Continue reading

2014 Neuroscience for Kids Poetry Contest

February is National Poetry Month (you might remember we held a brain-themed poetry contest back in 2011) and the Neuroscience for Kids team at the University of Washington is holding its annual poetry contest. There are different categories for different ages, but kids from kindergarten through high school can enter. For example, grades six to eight must submit a haiku, with the example given:

Three pounds of jelly
wobbling around in my skull
and it can do math.

Check out the Neuroscience for Kids website for the rules and entry form.

Continue reading

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