Winter Sports Concussion Prevention Tips

Concussion - Winter Sports.jpg

Photo: Shutterstock

With the XXIII Olympic Games set to take place in a few weeks in South Korea, the issue of concussions is front and center, thanks largely to well publicized concussion management protocols established as an outgrowth of a tragic history of traumatic brain injuries among professional football players.

For winter sports such as skiing, snowboarding, sledding, hockey, and ice skating—where high speeds and slippery surfaces are the norm—falls and collisions involving the head may lead to chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), a progressive, degenerative disease that has been linked to a litany of life-changing symptoms such as memory loss, impaired judgement, insomnia, dementia and depression so deep it pushed some retired football players, such as Junior Seau, to take their own lives.

With the high stakes that are involved in competing on a worldwide stage—there is concern that athletes may disregard reporting hits to the head as he or she pushes to the podium. For many athletes, the Olympics represents a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity, and they may fear getting sidelined in a sport where fleeting success rewards very few.

But whether you’re an Olympic athlete—or not—here are some injury prevention tips (from brainline.org) to make your winter sports experience a little safer:

Continue reading

%d bloggers like this: